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T04 - Wooden Ship - Crosby Stills & Nash
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A musical instrument similar to an electronic piano begins to play down the scale at a medium tempo, The keys play down the scale for eight notes then repeat. Sergeant Howie stares across at the open green gates of the cemetery before slowly stepping on over towards them. Only the keyboard piano sound and birds tweeting loudly can be heard. The Maypole that earlier had 12 boys dancing around has now oddly been pulled from the earth and is now rested against the stone wall of the churchyard. It's eerie existence almost suggests that it has never been used or is a permanent feature.

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The church yard is tranquil and peaceful and no one is around except for the sergeant. The large grave stone to the right reads:
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF JAMES HUNTER FARMER DIED 20TH MARCH 1886, AGED 73 YEARS, ALSO GRAZEL CRIERSON HIS WIFE ALSO DIED AT MESSYARD 2OTH DECEMBER 1855 YEARS.
THOMAS HIS SON WHO DIED 17 MOSSYARD 1ST NOVEMBER 18 AGED 5 YEARS, DAVID CRIERSON DIED IN February 1875, AGED 55 YEARS. ALSO HIS SON JOHN HUNTER WHO DIED AT FLEETBANK GATEHOUSE 11TH MAY 1908 AGED 79 YEARS, JAMES HUNTER HIS SON FARMER IN MOSSYARD WHO DIED 26TH MAY 1911 AGED 78 YEARS.

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The sergeant momentarilly stands between an arch of vines and pink flowers as he looks between two gravestones, The gravestone to the left reads, SACRED, MEMORY OF JAMES HAMILTON, ANN CRIERSON HIS WIFE DIED AT LACCAN 5TH OCTOBER, JANE, HIS DAUGHTER DIED AT LACCAN MAY 1832 AGED 24. THOMAS HAMILTON, HIS SON FARMER LACCAN, 20TH AUGUST 1869, ELIZABETH DICKSON WIFE OF THOMAS HAMILTON AT PENKILN 10TH JANUARY 1903, JEANIS HAMILTON, THEIR DAUGHTER WHO DIED AT SHEFFIELD 24TH JANUARY 1875 AGED, 17 YEARS. JAMES HAMILTON THEIR SON WHO DIED AT PENKILN, 21ST JANUARY 1932 AGED 75, JOHN HAMILTON THE YOUNGEST SON DIED AT BEETOWN JULY 1943 AGED 81.

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Sergeant Howie continues on after a few short seconds looking left as he does so noticing a peculiar looking tombstone. 

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Sergeant Howie walks on up to the tombstone and begins to read out loud the inscribed text.

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Sergeant Howie reads out aloud these words, "Here Lieth Beech Buchanan "Protected by the Ejaculation of Serpents"

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A young spruce tree has been planted directly in front of the tombstone that has a red ribbon of some kind attached to one of the thin branches. Sergeant Howie reaches out with his right hand and touches the ribbon as he ponders on it's identity. A few moments pass and the sergeant walks on as he begins to get a feel for the grave yard and it's dead and buried occupants.

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A trumpet can now be heard infused with the continuous downscale of the piano keyboard as the sergeant explores further.

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Sergeant Howie stumbles into a largely corroded building that appears to be a dead end but there is a doorway to the far right, As the sergeant walks slowly along the soft grass he places his left hand onto a piece of church furniture that has been discarded. He lifts the wood up slightly a couple of times to feel its weight and to evaluate it's age. Other large pieces of church furniture including pieces of pews and the altar are littered and piled up to the left. A large crypt is visible at the far end of the closed in space. A church lectern which is used to place the bible onto lays at an angle to the left of the large crypt. 

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The sergeant continues on as he walks past the crypt in front of him that has a skull and crossbones carved out of the stone and through the door to his right. In the Christian Church, the lectern is usually the stand on which the Bible rests and from which the "lessons" (reading from Scripture) are read during the service. ... Lecterns are often made of wood. They may be either fixed in place or portable. A lectern differs from a pulpit, the latter being used for sermons.

Miss Rose stated to the sergeant that the building attached to the ground or churchyard is no longer used for Christian worship, On this account Sergeant Howie has evaluated that the discarded church furniture was taken out of the Christian church building and has been replaced with something that is more suitable for the islands beliefs and customs. Memento mori (Latin: "remember (that) you will die") is the medieval Latin Christian theory and practice of reflection on mortality, especially as a means of considering the vanity of earthly life and the transient nature of all earthly goods and pursuits.

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The sergeant steps through the stone built door column and looks directly ahead as he slowly steps forward, Suddenly the sergeant stops in his tracks as something has caught his attention. The sergeant has a bleak expression on his face even though his true concerns are invisible at this moment.

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In the distance a woman can be seen sat down on the end of a piece of church furniture, Her right hand is outstretched and inside her palm is a white birds egg. The school master sang a song about the egg that hatched into a bird and the bird producing a feather, From this notion one thing grows into another, A seed falls into the ground, rain falls onto the seed, the seed grows and becomes wheat for example. 

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To the police officers dismay he can clearly see a young woman breast feeding her child while holding out the egg with her left hand, Bizarre as this seems to the officer it is quite normal for this woman to do this sort of thing, Her baby was an egg that grew from the food and water she consumed, Everything has a chain and life cycle and the residents of Summerisle believe in rebirth and renewal. The mother rocks gently from side to side as she smiles sweetly at the officer but is completely silent.

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The officer looks around from his position in a circular motion from his left as he surveys the environment, Maybe he can pick up some clues to the whereabouts of Rowan Morrison if he examines the area thoroughly, The sergeant makes no attempt to speak to the woman who to be honest is in a world of her own and wouldn't be of any help to the sergeant.

Another lectern lays at an angle as it rests against the back wall, Empty baskets lay empty on the ground while another wooden container has an abundance of rotting onions inside. Craftspeople and artists who specialize in making baskets are usually referred to as basket makers and basket weavers. Basketry is made from a variety of fibrous or pliable materials, anything that will bend and form a shape. Examples include pine straw, stems, animal hair, hide, grasses, thread, and fine wooden splints.

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Further examination shows an old and broken staircase that lead up to a rusted and oxidation consumed metal hinged door, This space was once a building of prayer but has fallen into extreme disrepair over the years, As Lord Summerisle and his people are atheists in relation to Jesus Christ and Christianity this building has been purposely left to decay. The fruit baskets and fruit pieces that lay scattered around the floor indicate that a new religion and belief system has manifested itself and the people have turned against Christianity and its values as they believe there system is the true one. Two broken wooden boxes sit on top of the staircase, one is empty and the other has a few apples inside it, Some wood that was broken away from the box to the right rests against the two boxes at an angle.
The boxes could express that the gateway to heaven is just a fable as the fruit is the true god and life, It is higher than the Christian God as Aphrodite is more to the liking of Summerisle. 

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Sergeant Howie slowly walks on up to the two broken boxes as he he holds his hat in his right hand. The mother who is breastfeeding turns her head as she watches the police officer carry out his affairs.
Pomona was the goddess of fruit trees, gardens, and orchards. Unlike many other Roman goddesses and gods, she does not have a Greek counterpart, though she is commonly associated with Demeter. ... She was not actually associated with the harvest of fruits itself, but with the flourishing of the fruit trees.

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Sergeant Howie looks carefully at both wooden boxes as he tries to fathom the relationship between fruits of the earth and Jesus Christ, Suddenly the sergeant raises his left hand and places it onto the corner left box facing him,

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With anger and frustration the sergeant snatches away the box from the top of the concrete stairs. A loud wooden scratching sound is heard as the box slides at speed.

Howie looks down with strong thoughts of contemplation as he has now realized the islanders real beliefs are something which he can't tolerate too well being a Christian. It's fine to accept and respect other peoples faiths and beliefs but this is going too far the sergeant considers. A small amount of apples fly out of the box as it travels through the air.

The wooden box crashes to the floor as apples expel in all directions, A loud wooden thudding sound is heard. The mother sat to the back of the sergeant instantly turns her head and watches the box and the apples fall into a crumpled pile on the floor, The woman looks further down at the box that is now resting on one of it's sides, The woman shows slight shock at the sergeants actions and has lost her smile, 

Howie is not content with just one box smashing to the floor and with a rapid speed Howie smashes the other box off the top with his left hand again, A single piece of wood that was resting on the last box to fall also becomes dislodged and falls to the floor, The woman slowly lowers her left arm and is now looking directly at the sergeant as he smashes off the second box,

The woman is now looking directly at the sergeant as he smashes of the second box, The mother leans forward from the sudden second outburst from the sergeant, This movement combined with the noise of the second box falling has now disturbed the breastfeeding baby as it brakes away from it's mothers left nipple and also looks over at the sergeant. The babies feet kick out then widen from the loud disturbance. A crow is heard squawking three times. Howie turns his head and looks down at the now empty space where the first box once was as he considers his thoughts.

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Howie looks to his right and now focuses his attention on the two remaining pieces of wood that lay on top of each other, Howie picks up the two pieces of timber with his left hand as he continues to hold his hat to his right side with his right hand.

The Sergeant lowers his left hand with wood in hand as he stretches out his right hand and places his police hat down onto the stone surface, a light thud is heard. The baby has now become interested with the white egg that the babies mother still holds in her left hand, The baby raises it's left hand and touches the egg before lowering it's hand again. The sergeant holds the two pieces of wood in either hand as he looks down at the piece in his left hand, 

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Howie brings his hands together as he begins to pull at either side of the left piece of wood, The sergeant grimaces slightly as he applies pressure to the thin and flimsy timber, A loud cracking and splintering of wood is heard as the sergeant splits the wood at the bottom by pushing his left hand forward while holding it firmly with his right hand. The wood shakes and gyrates at a fast pace as Howie applies even pressure and this causes the wood to split to 75% of it's length.

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A crows squawking is heard two more times as the sergeant turns the split piece of timber around with his left hand. The sergeant then inserts the other piece of wood with his right hand into the the other pieces split section so that the wood now forms the shape of a cross, The sergeant has become angry from the experience he has endured to this point, He is frustrated and it is hard for the sergeant to accept the strange and unusual activities of the islanders, By creating a cross he is putting back something which he feels strongly about, He also feels that the islanders have desecrated the churchyard with there fake tombstones and neglect of the christian building, Church furniture lays scattered around that was just dumped there with no real love or respect for the christian faith and the sergeant will feel slightly better now that a symbol of Christianity exists in this place even though it is just two pieces of timber stuck together.

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The Sergeant slides his left hand down the split piece of wood as he lowers the cross shape so that he can adjust the other piece of wood, With his right hand Howie applies more pressure as he moves the piece of wood up and down two times as it sticks slightly then releases as it nudges into position. The woman continues to look at the sergeant in a static position as she stretches her head out more to the left with interest at what the sergeant is making.

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The Sergeant lowers his right hand and places it at the bottom of the cross as he looks at the shape and reflects on his life and the meaning of having a faith. Howie takes his right hand away as he continues to ponder his thoughts. The baby is becoming restless as it turns it's body to face the comfort of the mother's warm chest.

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A light wooden sound is heard as the thin timber is placed softly back to the stone surface, The Sergeant stares at the cross for a few moments more as he grabs his police hat with his left hand.

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Howie transfers the hat to his right hand once again as he continues to look at the cross, Howie squeezes the top of his hat with his right hand as he holds it tightly. He is hoping and praying that the power of God will help him to find Rowan Morrison and to make sense of the madness he is subtlety experiencing at this point. The baby starts to clamber up the mothers body by pushing with it's tiny legs and holding onto the mothers left side, The baby grabs the mothers left arm as it pulls and scrambles higher and higher. Howie nods slightly towards the cross in respect and prayer.

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The woman continues to watch the sergeant but is silent, Howie lowers his head after constructing his makeshift cross, service, sermon and finishing song all in the space of a minute. The mother carefully pulls her baby from under the arms and lifts him up so that the babies feet are stood on the mothers hips, The baby kicks out with his right leg as the mother releases her right hand momentarily, This causes the baby to flop back down again as he snuggles close to his mother. The woman turns her head as she watches the sergeant leave the dilapidated building area as she carefully holds onto her baby with both hands. At all times the mother never discards the egg from her left hand.  Howie turns to his right as he looks down while raising his left hand to his hat, He then holds his hat with both hands before releasing with his left, Howie walks slowly forward with his hat down by his right side with his head slightly bowed. 

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A rumbling of non electric motors and blades are hears as the local gardener and grave digger for the church grounds carries out his duties for the day, The man walks at a fast pace as he pushes his lawnmower over the soft grass.

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The Gardener takes huge strides as he pushes the mower in a straight line.

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Sergeant Howie has returned to the spot where he found the strange tombstone and young spruce tree, Sergeant Howie is standing motionless as he shouts out "Morning". The gardener stops in his tracks as soon as he hears the sergeants words and looks to his left as he also replies "Morning".  His lawn mower rattles loudly as it comes to a stop. The gardener is smoking a pipe and was unaware of the police officers presence.

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The gardener raises his right hand to his smoking pipe as he slowly walks on over to the sergeant. Sergeant Howie say's, I see you plant trees on most of the graves here. A puff of smoke comes out of the gardeners mouth as he takes a long drag of his pipe before he say's, Aye, that's right.

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The Sergeant points his left index finger towards another young spruce tree that is all alone in a spot of ground, The sergeant say's, What tree is that? 

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The gardener replies, That's a Rowan. (Birds are heard chirping). The Rowan tree has a long, sacred history. Since ancient times people have been planting a Rowan beside their home as in Celtic mythology it's known as the Tree of Life and symbolises courage, wisdom and protection.

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The sergeant replies, And who lies there? The gardener is looking at the tree then turns and looks directly at the sergeant before saying, "Rowan Morrison". The gardener is in a happy mood but is also giving of an air of sarcasm or untruthfulness as he twists his pipe from side to side in a playful kind of way. All is quiet as the sergeant nods his head positively and um's under his breath from the gardeners remark.

The sergeant takes a few steps closer to the tree as he taps his police hat with his right hand three times in quick succession against his right leg. (A soft tapping sound is heard) Sergeant Howie holds his hat with both hands as he returns his left to the rim, The gardener returns his pipe to his mouth with his right hand as he inhales the strong tobacco, 
As the gardener inhales on his pipe the sergeant say's with a tone of seriousness, How long has she been dead? The gardener removes his pipe from his mouth as he looks down and say's, Oh, six or Seven months.

The Gardener points his pipe towards the young tree with his right hand as he say's, "They're just a wee bit" The gardener looks at the sergeant then back down again, "late with the headstone". The gardener chuckles slightly from his remark.

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The sergeant bends down slightly as he notices a red type of stringy ribbon attached to the young tree, The sergeant say's as he bends, What on earth's that?, It looks like a piece of skin.

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The gardener replies, Why, so it is, the sergeant looks up from the tree and directly at the gardener from his remark. The sergeant returns his eyes to the red stringy ribbon then say's, Well. what is it?

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The gardener lowers his head slightly then grabs the red ribbon with his right hand that is holding his pipe also, The gardener looks at the sergeant and say's as he presents the string to him by holding it with his left hand also, "The poor wee lassie's navel string of course". The gardeners left thumb opens to a full extension as he presents the unpleasant string to the sergeant.

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The sergeant slowly stands up from the tree after finding out the true identity of the red ribbon, The gardener continues, "Where else should it be but hung on her own little tree"? The sergeant looks up at the sky as he scrunches his eyes momentarily from the bright sunshine, As the sergeant closes his eyes for a fleeting moment he takes in a deep breath of air then say's, Where does your minister live?

The gardener raises his head away from the Rowan's navel string as he stands upright, He say's, Minister? The gardener is taken back by the sergeants words and cant accept that the sergeant has described Lord Summerisle as a minister. The gardener begins to chuckle before a second of silence, The chuckle returns but it is much louder this time as he turns his head away from the sergeant.

All is silent except the chirping of birds and the loud chuckling of the gravedigger, He say's, "Minister!" with a giggling expression and finds the sergeant rather humorous, No doubt sergeant Howie is not finding the gardeners chuckling advantageous or respectful.

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A light tapping of feet is heard as the sergeant makes his way back to May Morrison at the Post Office and Sweet store. Children's laughter and chatter can be heard in the distance including the chirping of birds. 

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The sergeant walks straight to the front door and immediately pushes his way inside.

The post office door bell begins to ring as the sergeant opens the door and walks inside of the shop, May Morrison is in the back room and is attending to Myrtle who has now developed a sore throat, Mrs Morrison holds a live frog in her right hand as she say's, Oh What a silly girl you are to make all this fuss. The frog is croaking loudly as Mrs Morrison holds it with her right thumb and middle finger.

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Myrtle is looking down at the frog and does not seem very happy, Mrs Morrison is showing the frog to Myrtle as she say's in a reassuring way, "It's just a little frog".

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Sergeant Howie has made his way to the entrance to the living room as Mrs Morrison has completely ignored or has not heard the bell ring. The sergeant stands motionless for a few short seconds just within the boundary of the shop and the back room as he watches Mrs Morrison and Myrtle from a distance. Mrs Morrison continues, It'll do that poor sore throat good.

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The sergeant decides he will go and disturb Mrs Morrison and begins to walk in to her.

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Mrs Morrison lowers her head closer to Myrtle as she say's, "Now anyone would think you didn't want to get better". Myrtle looks at Mrs Morrison with a silence and solemn face then back down again, The frog wobbles from side to side within the fingers of Mrs Morrison as it croaks some more.

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Mrs Morrison say's, Now, in he goes! (Frogs are amazing. They are excellent indicators of the quality of their environment. They go from living completely underwater to an animal that breathes air. There are so many fascinating qualities! 
There are over 4,700 species of frogs!
They are found on every continent except Antarctica.
Every year that a frog goes into hibernation, a new layer of bone forms.
You can count these rings to find out the frog’s age.
Many frogs can jump 20 times their own height.
Some can jump even higher!
Frogs come in all sorts of colours.
The colourful skin of many tropical frogs acts as a warning to predators that these frogs are poisonous.)

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Mrs Morrison quickly inserts the live amphibian into Myrtle's mouth as Myrtle opens her mouth as wide as she possibly can, Mrs Morrison ensures the frog has been fully inserted by pushing with her thumb, A crunching sloppy sound is heard as the frog disappears into Myrtles mouth.

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Myrtle is almost choking on the frog as it finds a new home inside Myrtles mouth, 

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Mrs Morrison suddenly feels more like a frog than a Pagan atheist as her eyes become wide and round, She puckers her lips tightly and her nose becomes inflated and her nostrils expand as she impersonates Myrtle and a frog at the same time. Mrs Morrison is helping and persuading Myrtle to copy her mouth actions.

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All is silent as Myrtle continues to sucker down on the frog while watching the strange faces of Mrs Morrison. After a few seconds have passed Myrtle's eyes start to look up towards her eyebrows from the extreme effort of keeping a live frog in her mouth. The sergeant is stood in the background and has not made an attempt to disturb Mrs Morrison at this point as he watches the strange and unusual remedy.

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A few short and awkward seconds have passed and now it is time for the frog to come back out of Myrtles mouth, Mrs Morrison releases her frog impression from her face as her mouth opens wide as her eyeballs look directly down from the bottom of her eye socket, Mrs Morrison is now letting Mrytle know that the frog should be released from her mouth now.

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Mrs Morrison say's with enthusiasm, "And out he comes" as she reaches into Myrtles mouth to retrieve the frog.

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Myrtle pushes the frog back out with her tongue as Mrs Morrison pulls with her fingers. A plucking crunching sound is heard as the frog is regurgitated. Myrtle is almost choking as the frog is pulled from her mouth.

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Mrs Morrison holds the frog in her right hand again as she say's, There, Now, that did'nt hurt much, did it?

The study of amphibians and reptiles is called Herpetology, and those who study them are called Herpetologists.
The name comes from the Greek word Herpeton which means “something that crawls”.
One of the ways you can tell a male frog from a female is by looking at their ears.
A frog’s ear is called tympanum and it is located just behind the eye. If the tympanum is larger than the frog’s eye, it is male; if it is smaller, it is female.

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Myrtle begins to become upset as she say's, It tasted of Orange. The frog croaks some more as Mrs Morrison places the amphibian back into a small plastic container carefully with her right hand.

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Did you know that frogs moult? This is the process where they shed their skin.
Most frogs moult once a week but some will do it every day! Once the old skin has been pulled off, the frog usually eats it!
Croaking is used by male frogs as a way to attract females.
Each frog species has a distinct croak. They have vocal sacs, which fill with air, and can amplify the sound up to a mile away!
Frogs have teeth on their upper jaw, which they use to keep their prey in one place until they can swallow it.
Frogs swallow using their eyes; its eyes retract into its head and help push the food down its throat.

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Mrs Morrison tries to make Myrtle feel better by saying, Never mind, darling, It's all over now. Mrs Morrison has a surprise for Myrtle as she suddenly produces a large jar of giant gobstoppers, Mrytle whimpers softly as she looks down in a sad way, Mrs Morrison say's, Here's your sweet for being a brave girl, (More croaking is heard)

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Mrs Morrison tilts the glass jar of rainbow colored sweets towards Mrytle and say's, "Come on" Which one would you like?, Myrtle reaches in with her right hand as a rattling of gobstoppers is heard hitting the sides of the glass jar.

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Myrtle quickly chooses a bright red gobstopper and immediately places it into her mouth, Mrs Morrison say's to comfort the girl, "There" as she smiles brightly.

Mrs Morrison places the heavy jar into her right hand as she puts her left hand around Myrtle and say's, He's got your horrid old sore throat now, hasn't he, poor creature?, Myrtle looks up at Mrs Morrison with a sad expression on her face before looking over her shoulder at the frog in the plastic container. Sergeant Howie has come into view and has been watching the whole event.

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The frog croaks some more as it takes a few steps forward to the left.

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Frogs don’t drink water with their mouths; they “drink” by absorbing water through their skin.
Frogs have permeable skin, which means liquids and gases can pass through it. There is a bad side to having permeable skin, though. Frogs are at risk of absorbing whatever pollutions are in the water and air, and they can easily get dehydrated if they are away from water for too long.

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Sergeant Howie is silent as he looks down at Mrytle and the frog in the box, Mrs Morrison say's to Mrytle, "Can't you hear him croaking?" (Croaking is heard two times)

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Mrs Morrison raises her head up and looks at the sergeant as she say's, Can I do anything for you, sergeant?

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The sergeant looks away from the frog and directly at Mrs Morrison as he say's, Oh I doubt it, The sergeant hesitates for a brief moment then say's, seeing you're all raving mad.

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The sergeant has seen and heard enough as he turns and leaves Mrs Morrison and Mrytle to there own demises.

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A rapid series of notes are played that sound similar to a Chinese styled string instrument,  Sergeant Howie has made his way over to the (REGISTRAR OF BIRTHS, DEATHS AND MARRIAGES OFFICE,) This office is also authorised for REGISTRAR FOR CIVIL MARRIAGES. Howie stands outside the door as he reads the sign that is attached to the left side wall.

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A few moments pass as he hesitates before stepping over to the glass paneled door. Howie lowers his left hand to turn the handle as he makes his way in.  A loud scuffling of feet is heard including a low level metallic ding from the handle.

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Low level thuds are heard as Howie takes the few short steps over to the silent librarian.Howie slowly walks on over to the woman who is sat at a desk eating peaches from a small bowl with a spoon. She is silent and is looking down at her desk reading a paperback entry journal. The librarian turns a page over with her left hand as she continues to hold the page in her hand, She holds a spoon full of peaches in her right hand but is too engrossed to even look up at the sergeant or to eat her fruit pieces.

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The librarian suddenly looks up at the sergeant as he say's, "Good Evening" The librarian smiles at the sergeant as she rests the page down she was holding up with her left hand. 

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Sergeant Howie folds his arms by raising his left hand to his chest followed by his right, Howie say's, I'd like to see your index of deaths, please. The librarian replies, Do you have authority?

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Suddenly the sergeant reaches into his right side upper jacket pocket with his left hand as a rummaging of paper is heard. The sergeant produces his notebook and looks down as he pulls a blue metal badge from the top of the booklet. (A metal chinking is heard) Howie sets the notebook down as a thud is heard, The librarian is chewing on her food as she looks down at the table.

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The sergeant opens up the blue badge holder and then holds up a certificate from the West Highland police constabulary that confirms that Sergeant Howie is who he say's he is (ID). As soon as the sergeant presents his ID to the librarian the librarian chuckles slightly under her breath as she say's, No I meant from his lordship.

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All is silent for a few seconds then the sergeant say's, "I don't need it". The officer replies as she nods her head negatively, I'm afraid you have to get permission from Lord Summerisle.

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The sergeant folds the certificate with his left hand as he quickly places it down onto his notebook, (The important document has a crest at the top and is signed by Sergeant Howie and also the chief constable and dated.)

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The sergeant folds the certificate with his left hand as he quickly places it down onto his notebook, The librarian puts a spoon full of fruit into her mouth, Howie rests both of his hands on the table as he looks down and say's, Miss..A chinking of cutlery is heard as the officer puts her spoon back into her bowl, The sergeant leans forward slightly and looks back at the lady as he say's with a serious tone of voice, If you don't cooperate with me here and now, You may well find yourself... 

(The librarian looks up at the sergeant as she begins to take him more seriously) inside a police cell on the mainland tonight!.

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Howie increases the volume of his voice slightly, "Have I made myself quite clear?"

The librarian lowers her right hand to retrieve a white handkerchief that is laying below the table, She then takes her left hand away from the paper back journal as she lifts the white cloth to her mouth using both hands. The librarian is looking down and away from the sergeant as she gently places the cloth to her top lip. Sergeant Howie is feeling a little frustrated as he outstretches his left hand as a gesture and say's, "Please"

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The librarian looks back at the sergeant as she lowers the handkerchief back down below the table. The sergeant continues to hold his left hand out as he waits patiently for a sensible response from the librarian.

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The librarian places her left hand outstretched onto the paper back journal as she looks down to a desk beneath the table, A sliding of wood is heard as the lady pulls open the underneath draw.

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The librarian reaches into the draw with her left hand and retrieves a tin of peaches that she quickly places onto the table, A loud thud is heard as she places the heavy item down, The librarian looks back at the sergeant as he continues to hold his hand out for something that he wants, 

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The sergeants gesture of holding out his hand is putting pressure on the librarian as she looks back inside the desk, Suddenly she pulls out a large hardback book which is the register for births and deaths for the island of Summerisle. She hands the large book over to the sergeant with her right hand as she looks back up at him and smirks slightly at being defeated. She then smiles politely as she folds her hands together as the book is transferred over to the sergeants left hand. The sergeant say's "Thank You" as the camera zooms in onto the face of the librarian.

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The sergeant sneezes loudly as he takes the book into his hands, A loud rummaging of paper is heard as the sergeant begins to search through the register, The sergeant begins to talk to himself as he say's, M M M M in quick succession as he  attempts to locate Morrison, More sounds of chinking cutlery is heard from the librarian as she looks down briefly then back up at the now busy officer, As she stares at the man she smirks with contempt as she moves her mouth around from side to side but is otherwise solemn.

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The Librarian raises her right hand and wipes the top of her mouth again with the white handkerchief as she continues to chew on her fruit, The sergeant is engrossed in the register as he reads down a page to his left, The sergeant begins to read out some of the information aloud and say's, "Benjamin and Rachel Morrison" 

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The sergeant say's, Rachel and Benjamin before looking up as he ponders on the names, The librarian looks to her right as she looks down at her fruit while still chewing,

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The sergeant continues, Names from the bible, (Rachel is first mentioned in the Hebrew Bible in Genesis 29 when Jacob happens upon her as she is about to water her father's flock. She was the second daughter of Laban, Rebekah's brother, making Jacob her first cousin.

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The librarian replies, "Yes", They were very old. (Benjamin (Hebrew: בנימין, "Son of the right side") was the last-born of Jacob's thirteen children (12 sons and 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel in Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition. He was the progenitor of the Israelite Tribe of Benjamin.)

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The librarian immediately raises her right hand with a spoonful of fruit as she places it into her mouth.

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More chinking of cutlery is heard as the librarian continues to eat her fruit from the bowl, The sergeant say's, "But there's no record of Rowan Morrison's death, which means of course there is no death certificate." The librarian looks up for a short moment, The sergeant then looks up for a fleeting moment as he contemplates his discovery, The sergeant then looks back down as he closes the register with both hands, A loud thud is heard as the book slams shut. 

The sergeant hands back the register with his left hand as he say's, Did you know her?, 

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As the librarian begins to place the register back inside the lower draw she replies, Yes, of course. A light wooden banging sound is heard as the draw closes back, She then sticks her tongue out quickly as she continues to look away from the officer, The sergeant is looking down at the table, 

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The sergeant removes the photo of Rowan Morrison from his notebook and holds it up to the librarian with his right hand, 

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The sergeant say's, "Is that her" as the librarian turns to look at the image, The librarian nods positively as she replies, Yes, that's her.

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The sergeant hesitates for a few seconds then say's with a serious tone of voice, "How did she die?"

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The librarian looks up at the sergeant in silence then back at the photograph, 

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The librarian say's, I don't know, 

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The librarian say's, I don't know, The librarian becomes slightly amused as she chuckles under her breath and say's, I don't know anything about her, The librarian hesitates then replies as she nods negatively, "Nothing."

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The sergeant continues to hold the photo up to the librarian for a few moments before snatching the image away as he looks at the librarian with a face of unknowing, A rummaging of paper is heard as the sergeant looks down and places the photo back into his notebook, 

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The librarian just watches the sergeant in silence as he places the photo back, More rummaging of paper is heard.

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As the sergeant places his notebook into his right upper jacket pocket with his left hand the sergeant say's, Thank you.

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The sergeant continues to place his notebook back as he turns and leaves the room, The librarian is silent as she turns her head right as she watches the sergeant make his way out of the office.

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For further reading on Witches and spells please click on the image to your left.

A loud sound of a door bell dinging is heard together with sounds of people talking in the distance from outside as the door opens, A loud thud is heard as the door shuts abruptly creating another ding ding sound from the bell.  Sergeant Howie has left the registration office and has now made his way to the local drugs store, T.H.Lennox is the proprieter of the store and was seen earlier in the Green man pub singing and dancing, The shop would seem more suited to a witch with it's vast collection of jars and bottles. Dimethylglyoxime is a chemical compound described by the formula CH₃CCCH₃. Its abbreviation is dmgH₂ for neutral form, and dmgH for anionic form, where H stands for hydrogen. This colourless solid is the dioxime derivative of the diketone butane-2,3-dione. DmgH₂ is used in the analysis of palladium or nickel. It's coorination complexes are of theoretical interest as models for enzymes and as catalysts. Many related ligands can be prepared from other diketones, e.g. benzil.

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Rats Brains and Snake Oil Embrocation are clearly on view including a two headed Gerbil. The sergeant speaks clearly and loudly, Are you Mr Lennox, the photographer?

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Mr Lennox replies, Oh, I'm firstly a chemist, secondly a photographer. (Sounds of children and adults talking and laughing from outside can be heard)

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A light tapping from the sergeants feet is heard as he comes closer to the Chemist, The sergeant say's, I understand that you take the harvest festival photographs every year,

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The sergeant continues, The ones I saw in The Green Man, "Ah Yes" the chemist replies.

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The chemist continues, It's rather humdrum work, I'm afraid.

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Do you know what happened to last year's photograph? *Children can be heard from outside)

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The chemist replies with concern, Isn't it there with the others? "No No it's not" the sergeant replies. 

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The sergeant continues, No Apparently it's been broken or damaged in some way.

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The chemist replies, Oh, what a pity, The sergeant hesitates then say's, Would you have a copy of it?, The chemist nods his head negatively and say's, Oh no, I don't keep copies.

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The sergeant replies, Mr Lennox, you were among the people to whom I showed the photograph. A rummaging of paper is heard as the sergeant pulls out his notebook. The sergeant looks down as he say's, in the Green Man, The sergeant looks back at the chemist.

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The sergeant holds the image of Rowan up with his right hand so that the chemist can clearly see, The sergeant say's with a serious tone of voice, Is that the girl?, The chemist is using a pestle and mortar as he grinds up an unknown substance, His right hand moves around and around as he looks at the photo.

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A low level wooden thud is heard from his pestle as he stops grinding, The chemist is silent as he looks at the image, The chemist replies after a few seconds, It's difficult to say, The sergeant is becoming a little frustrated and slightly angry as he say's, Oh come on man!

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The sergeant continues, It was only Eight months a go, The sergeant looks down quickly then back up as he say's, Surely you remember if it was that girl or not.

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The chemist is silent and motionless as he just looks at the police officer without knowing how to reply to the sergeants abrupt reasoning, 

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Sergeant Howie is also silent as he waits for an answer from the chemist but nothing seems to be coming, Howie quickly looks down then back up as he focuses on the photograph that is in the chemists right hand.

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Howie retrieves the photo with his right hand as he say's, Thank You, A sound of paper slapping is heard from the photo in the sergeants hand as he turns and leaves the drug store still none the wiser.

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The song written and sung by Paul Giovanni begins to play again. (Corn Rigs.  [Magnet] 1973.) ♪ Corn Rigs and Barley Rigs

Sergeant Howie is having a difficult time extracting any worthwhile or helpful information from any of the local people up to now, He has decided that he will go and pay a visit to Lord Summerisle himself, By talking to the Lord the sergeant will surely be able to find out something on the whereabouts of Rowan Morrison. The sergeant takes a carriage ride pulled by a Strong adult horse as he enjoys the beautiful scenery and fresh sweet summer smells of flowers and green grass. A sound of tapping hoofs is heard as the horse pulls the carraige along the path. 

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♪ And Corn Rigs are Bonnie.

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The camera spins around in a circular motion as more scenery is shown, 

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The garden bushes have been sculptured into strange shapes suggesting procreation as Howie travels further into the countryside of Summerisle.

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♪ I'll not forget that happy night. (Horses hoofs can be heard)

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♪ Among the Rigs with Annie.

Pink Flowering Trees
The Crab Apple Tree. A pink flowering Crab apple tree in your garden will turn every neighbor to envy. ...
The Dogwood Tree. These trees are relatively small and very ideal for those with small gardens. ...
The Cherry Tree. ...
The Almond Tree. ...
The Crape Myrtle.

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(Shetland Pony information) THE harsh climes of Scotland’s far north helped create a strong, clever and adaptable beast. The ponies are thought to have first arrived in Shetland more than 2,000 years ago after trekking from southern Europe over the ice fields. Although they never stand more than four-feet tall, they are the strongest of all the horse breeds with an ability to pull twice their own body weight. They are also considered to be fiercely intelligent. Excavations on Shetland have suggested that small ponies have existed on the islands since the Bronze Age with the small, stout pony possibly a result of Celtic settlers crossing the southern European beast with an Oriental breed.

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A guitar is heard. The sergeant makes his way along a field of fruit trees as the Coachman travels further towards Lord Summerisles castle. (A change in law in the mid 1800 that banned children from entering coal pits signalled a new era for the Shetland pony, with many “exchanging the freedom of the hills for the darkness of the mines,” the society said. It was their “docile and willing” nature that allowed them to adapt well to their underground environment. The Marquis of Londonderry set up a stud in the 1870s on the islands of Bressay and Noss to supply ponies for the collieries he owned in County Durham.
Around this time, interest in the pony was huge and thousands of ponies left the islands, perhaps as many as 1,000 a year in the last 20 years of the 19th Century. Many were exported over the Atlantic.)

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A recorder instrument now accompanies the guitar, Loud thuds from the horses hoofs are heard.

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(Birds tweeting can be heard) A woman wearing an Orange dress walks along between the trees as a loud sound of earth and grass is heard from her feet. 

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Another woman appears to the right wearing a yellow dress, She has a large smile on her face and is very happy among the natural environment, The woman stretch there arms out high as they praise there Sun God for providing them with fruit trees of the earth and beautiful green grass to walk on. 

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The woman produce light tapping sounds as they walk along in a line, Another woman becomes visible to the right wearing a white dress, She also shows signs of extreme happiness and joy at being part of mother nature.

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The woman wearing a white dress reaches out with her right hand and touches one of the blossoming fruit trees as she makes her way past.

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Nothing has quite stirred the sergeant until he passes by an oddly bizarre ceremony that consists of 12 teenage girls that are sat around 6 stones and a circular center piece. A small log fire burns in the center of the stones as the girls sit with there legs wide open, Strange Rock formations similar to Stonehenge in Great Britain embed into the soft ground. They are performing a strange hand signaled dance and are in synchronization with each other. (Dance formation) Left hand is holding onto right forearm, Right hand brings into chest as palm faces outwards, Left hand is then outstretched fully before being lowered to floor, The girls left hand is then outstretched before her hand is opened fully palm facing out, Left hand is then brought in then outstretched fully before being lowered,  Right hand is lifted half height as the hand sways from side to side. The high priestess appears from the right with her hands held high, Her left hand is lower than her right, 

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Facts about Stonehenge:

Built in several stages, Stonehenge began about 5,000 years ago as a simple earthwork enclosure where prehistoric people buried their cremated dead. The stone circle was erected in the centre of the monument in the late Neolithic period, around 2500 BC.

Two types of stone are used at Stonehenge: the larger sarsens, and the smaller bluestones. There are 83 stones in total.

A circle of 56 pits, known as the Aubrey Holes (named after John Aubrey, who identified them in 1666), sits inside the enclosure. Its purpose remains unknown, but some believe the pits once held stones or posts.

The stone settings at Stonehenge were built at a time of “great change in prehistory,” says English Heritage, “just as new styles of ‘Beaker’ pottery and the knowledge of metalworking, together with a transition to the burial of individuals with grave goods, were arriving from Europe. From about 2400 BC, well furnished Beaker graves such as that of the Amesbury Archer are found nearby”.

Stonehenge has a long relationship with astronomers, the report explains. In 1720, Dr Halley used magnetic deviation and the position of the rising sun to estimate the age of Stonehenge. He concluded the date was 460 BC. And, in 1771, John Smith mused that the estimated total of 30 sarsen stones multiplied by 12 astrological signs equalled 360 days of the year, while the inner circle represented the lunar month.

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(The Amesbury Archer) An early Bronze age figure found near Stonehenge during excavation for a housing development, now called Archer's Gate. This image is of the display in the redeveloped Wiltshire Archaeology Gallery at Salisbury Museum. 

The first mention of Stonehenge – or ‘Stanenges’ – appears in the archaeological study of Henry of Huntingdon in about AD 1130, and that of Geoffrey of Monmouth six years later. In 1200 and 1250 it appeared as ‘Stanhenge’ and ‘Stonhenge’; as ‘Stonheng’ in 1297, and ‘the stone hengles’ in 1470. It became known as ‘Stonehenge’ in 1610, says English Heritage.

In the 1880s, after carrying out some of the first scientifically recorded excavations at the site, Charles Darwin concluded that earthworms were largely to blame for the Stonehenge stones sinking through the soil.

The circular earth bank and ditch that surrounds the stones can be dated back to about 3100 BC, while the first stones are believed to have been raised at the site between 2400 and 2200 BC.
Over the next few hundred years, the stones were rearranged and new ones added, with the formation we know today being created between 1930 and 1600 BC.

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Summer solstice 2018, 

In 2013, a team of archaeologists excavated the cremated remains of 50,000 bones at the site, belonging to 63 men, women and children. These bones date back as early as 3000 BC, though some are only dated back to 2500 BC. This suggests that Stonehenge may have been a burial ground at the start of its history, though it is not clear if that was the site’s primary purpose.

Some of the stones were brought from nearly 200 miles away, They were quarried at a town near the Welsh town of Maenclochog and somehow transported to Wiltshire – a feat that would have been a major technical accomplishment at the time.

The monument’s stones possess unusual acoustic properties – when struck they produce a loud clanging sound – which likely explains why someone bothered to transport them over such a long distance. In certain ancient cultures, such rocks are believed to contain healing powers. In fact, Maenclochog means “ringing rock”.

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(Image Above - Druids and pagans take part in a Winter Solstice ceremony at Stonehenge in 2011 ( Matt Cardy/Getty ) According to this legend, the wizard Merlin removed Stonehenge from Ireland, where it had been erected by giants, and rebuilt it in Wiltshire as a memorial to 3,000 nobles slain in battle with the Saxons.

The earliest known realistic painting of Stonehenge was produced in the 16th century, Flemish artist Lucas de Heere painted the watercolour artwork on site, sometime between 1573 and 1575.

The Battle of the Beanfield was a clash between a convoy of approximately 600 New Age travellers and around 1,300 police that took place over the course of several hours on 1 June 1985. The battle erupted when the travellers, who were en route to Stonehenge to set up the Stonehenge Free Festival, were stopped at a police roadblock seven miles from the landmark.

The confrontation turned violent, with eight police and 16 travelers being hospitalized and 537 of the travelers arrested in one of the biggest mass arrests of civilians in English history.

The enduring myths surrounding Stonehenge make the UNESCO World Heritage Site hugely popular. When it first opened to the public as a tourist attraction in the 20th century, visitors were able to walk among the stones and even climb on them. However, due to serious erosion of the stones, the monument has been roped off since 1997, and visitors are only allowed to view the stones from a distance.

Exceptions are made during the summer and winter solstices, and the spring and autumn equinoxes, however.

In 2013, a team of archaeologists excavated the cremated remains of 50,000 bones at the site, belonging to 63 men, women and children. These bones date back as early as 3000 BC, though some are only dated back to 2500 BC. This suggests that Stonehenge may have been a burial ground at the start of its history, though it is not clear if that was the site’s primary purpose.

Some of the stones were brought from nearly 200 miles away, They were quarried at a town near the Welsh town of Maenclochog and somehow transported to Wiltshire – a feat that would have been a major technical accomplishment at the time.

The monument’s stones possess unusual acoustic properties – when struck they produce a loud clanging sound – which likely explains why someone bothered to transport them over such a long distance. In certain ancient cultures, such rocks are believed to contain healing powers. In fact, Maenclochog mean “ringing rock”.

In 2013, a team of archaeologists excavated the cremated remains of 50,000 bones at the site, belonging to 63 men, women and children. These bones date back as early as 3000 BC, though some are only dated back to 2500 BC. This suggests that Stonehenge may have been a burial ground at the start of its history, though it is not clear if that was the site’s primary purpose.

Some of the stones were brought from nearly 200 miles away, They were quarried at a town near the Welsh town of Maenclochog and somehow transported to Wiltshire – a feat that would have been a major technical accomplishment at the time.

The monument’s stones possess unusual acoustic properties – when struck they produce a loud clanging sound – which likely explains why someone bothered to transport them over such a long distance. In certain ancient cultures, such rocks are believed to contain healing powers. In fact, Maenclochog mean “ringing rock”.

In 2013, a team of archaeologists excavated the cremated remains of 50,000 bones at the site, belonging to 63 men, women and children. These bones date back as early as 3000 BC, though some are only dated back to 2500 BC. This suggests that Stonehenge may have been a burial ground at the start of its history, though it is not clear if that was the site’s primary purpose.

Some of the stones were brought from nearly 200 miles away, They were quarried at a town near the Welsh town of Maenclochog and somehow transported to Wiltshire – a feat that would have been a major technical accomplishment at the time.

The monument’s stones possess unusual acoustic properties – when struck they produce a loud clanging sound – which likely explains why someone bothered to transport them over such a long distance. In certain ancient cultures, such rocks are believed to contain healing powers. In fact, Maenclochog mean “ringing rock”.

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An equinox is commonly regarded as the instant of time when the plane (extended indefinitely in all directions) of Earth's equator passes through the center of the Sun.  In other words, it is the moment at which the center of the visible Sun is directly above the Equator. In the northern hemisphere, the equinox in March is called the Vernal or Spring Equinox; the September equinox is called the Autumnal or Fall Equinox. However, because the Moon (and to a lesser extent the other planets) cause the motion of the Earth to vary from a perfect ellipse, the equinox is now officially defined by the Sun's more regular ecliptic longitude rather than it's declination. The instants of the equinoxes are currently defined to be when the longitude of the Sun is 0° and 180°.
There are tiny (up to 1¼ arcsecond variations in the sun's latitude, which means the Sun's center is rarely precisely over the equator under the official definition. The two understandings of the equinox can lead to discrepancies of up to 69 seconds. On the day of an equinox, daytime and nighttime are of approximately equal duration all over the planet. They are not exactly equal, however, due to the angular size of the Sun, atmospheric refraction, and the rapidly changing duration of the length of day that occurs at most latitudes around the equinoxes. The word is derived from the Latin aequinoctium, from aequus (equal) and nox (Genitive noctis) Night.

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The teenage girls have both of their hands outstretched with legs wide,

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I See Fire (Kygo Remix) - Ed Sheeran
00:00

The girls now twist there right legs back behind themselves before raising there right hand horizontal in front of them before raising it straight up vertically, They then snake there right hand in and out before folding both arms together, The high priestess slowly walks closer to the small log fire with hands raised up high.

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The High Priestess is using a different set of hand signals as she slowly brings her right hand in towards her chest, 

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The High Priestess slowly brings her left hand in to her chest also so that both hands produce a V shape.

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The woman who touched a blossoming fruit tree earlier continues to walk among the Sun Gods gifts to humanity. The woman reaches up with her left hand as the urge to touch another tree has become to great. This woman may be expecting a child and she is at one with nature and her child will also follow the true faith of the Sun God deity.

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THE WISE WOMAN. The High Priestess is the goddess of inner wisdom and strength. Her energy enables you to tap into your true essence and connect with the divine energy that flows through you. She is a student and a teacher, able to impart wisdom because she has lived it. She is curious about life; not to conquer it but to understand it. 

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The priestess produces a flowery type of necklace which she raises to her forehead with both hands as she closes her eyes and prays to the Sun God deity for forgiveness and immortality, The priestesses white robes flow and snake in the cool breeze.

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The High priestess suddenly swings her hands backwards as the flames of the log fire erupt from the supernatural powers of mother nature, The girls extend there left hands out towards the fire which provides them with rebirth wisdom energy renewal. (Birds chirping can be heard)

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The teenage age girls begin to dance around the circular stones and log fire as they jump up and down from side to side,

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The girls jump up on there left legs as they raise there hands high before changing over to there right legs,

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As they dance around in a very energetic way they begin to sing a song. " ♪ Take the flames inside you, 

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♪ Burn and burn below - The girls hop and skip in a rhythmic motion as the priestess stands with her hands held high, The priestess shakes her hands slightly as she looks up at the sky in deep thought and praise for her God.

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♪ Fire seed and fire feed

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